RPGs of the Famicom: Earthbound Beginnings

Earthbound Beginnings | Title

With the release of Earthbound Beginnings on the Wii U e-shop, Nintendo of America has corrected a 26 year old mistake on their part. Earthbound Beginnings is the prequel to Earthbound on the SNES that was not originally released in Japan. The game was originally intended to be localized but was canceled despite the localization having already been fully completed. Until now the translated version of Earthbound Beginnings (which was otherwise known as Earthbound Zero) could only be played via emulation or a reproduction cart. Nintendo just now released the translated version for the Wii U e-shop making it available more easily and and legally.

Earthbound Beginnings is different from its successor in plenty of ways and is mostly an inferior game, but this is usually to be expected in terms of sequels. Even if one were to hold Earthbound Beginnings to the standards of a lot of modern day games it still handles things far more competently than most and is an amazing game on its own. Read more

Splatterhouse Retrospective #2 – Splatterhouse: Wanpaku grafitti (NES)

Splatterhouse: Wanpaku Graffiti | Box

Now it is time for part two of the Splatterhouse retrospective, but that does not mean that I am reviewing Splatterhouse 2, although I just finished it on the day I am writing this. There is instead this strange chibi spinoff called Splatterhouse Wanpaku Grafitti that was only released in Japan on the Famicom. Seems like a strange direction to take the series in considering the only game released prior was the arcade original. Yes I know plenty of games have chibi spinoffs, but they usually wait until there is more than one title. The gameplay of Wanpaku Grafitti is also noticeably different from the original, so I don’t even know why it’s a Splatterhouse game. And no, there’s no gore either. The game was alright but nothing particularly special, and can be recommended if you liked Monster Party but kinda wish it made a little more sense and didn’t have game breaking bugs.

I could not quite understand what the plot was about from what little was provided. The original game ended with Jenny dead after Rick escaped from the mansion, and hear you have them as kids. Even more strange is that Rick starts out dead in a coffin with Jenny nearby… even though it’s supposed to be the other way around. Rick randomly comes back to life and is reunited with his girlfriend… for about two seconds until a giant pumpkin comes and takes her. Yeah I know, makes perfect sense.

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RPGs of the Famicom: Sweet Home

Sweet Home | Title Screen

If you live outside of Japan, you likely don’t know of many JRPGs prior to the 16 bit era. Hell, you may not even know of many DURING the 16 bit era either. Until Final Fantasy VII popularized the genre with its cinematic CG cutscenes and enormous marketing budget (not that the game had no merits in story or gameplay, but plenty of other games did to), even the most popular JRPGs in Japan were a niche attraction in the west. JRPGs retailed for up to $80 at the time without adjusting for inflation, and publishers often could not afford quality localization teams. A majority of games localized by Ted Woolsey, for instance, were handled within a month and had to cut several sentences down. The fact that games like Chrono Trigger, Final Fantasy IV & VI, and Super Mario RPG had such strong scripts regardless really shows a testament to his ability, which allows me to cut him some slack for how bad Breath of Fire’s was (and also because Capcom themselves did a much worse with Breath of Fire II). Oh, and if you were in Europe then you likely never got ANY of these games.

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